Christchurch Earthquake Damage

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Trip Map
Trip Map
Bastin, S., Reid, C.M., Quigley, M.C. and Bassett, K.N. (2013). Earthquake Impacts on Soft Sediments in Eastern Christchurch. In: Reid, C.M. & Hampton, S.J. (compilers). Field Trip Guides, Geosciences 2013 Conference, Christchurch, New Zealand. Geoscience Society of New Zealand Miscellaneous Publication 136B, 21 p. ISBN 978‐1‐877480‐34‐8, ISSN 2230‐4487 (print) ISSN 2230‐4495 (online) https://securepages.co.nz/~gsnz/siteadmin/uploaded/gs_downloads/Fieldtrips/MP136B_FT3.pdf http://www.gsnz.org.nz/conference-field-trip-guides-c-2_9.html
11/24/13 11:20  AM
11/24/13 11:20 AM
Prof. Quigley, with the bike, meets field trip participants at his former Avonside house, now demolished.
11/24/13 11:21  AM
11/24/13 11:21 AM
Water service pipes for those unfortunate enough to have to remain in Avonside are above ground, as the soil keeps experiencing further liquefaction and settlement whenever aftershock ground motions top just 8% g, explains Quigley and his PhD student Bastin. The Avon River in the background.
11/24/13 12:00  PM
11/24/13 12:00 PM
Water service pipes for those unfortunate enough to have to remain in Avonside are above ground, as the soil keeps experiencing further liquefaction and settlement whenever aftershock ground motions top just 8% g, explains Quigley and his PhD student Bastin.
11/24/13 12:01  PM
11/24/13 12:01 PM
Water service pipes for those unfortunate enough to have to remain in Avonside are above ground, as the soil keeps experiencing further liquefaction and settlement whenever aftershock ground motions top just 8% g, explains Quigley and his PhD student Bastin.
11/24/13 11:26  AM
11/24/13 11:26 AM
House bought by the government, awaiting demolition. Only homeowners who had fire insurance were bought out within the Red Zone.
11/24/13 11:27  AM
11/24/13 11:27 AM
Prof. Quigley at the site of his former home, now removed. He has generously used the site as a test bed and for detailed observations of continued liquefaction, supporting Bastin’s PhD work.
11/24/13 11:31  AM
11/24/13 11:31 AM
About 15% of the homes in the neighborhood are still occupied, mostly by retired folks on fixed incomes who did not have insurance and will not be bought out by the government. For now, they get water and electric service, and have porta-potties instead of sewers. At some point, the city will cut off services.
11/24/13 11:32  AM
11/24/13 11:32 AM
White sandblow remnants in the grass at Quigley’s former property. He and Bastin have documented repeated sandblows on the property, during aftershocks with locally recorded ground motions not exceeding 8% g. The source sand is fine, well-sorted, and only 1800 years old! These sandblows are from liquefaction occurring after 2011.
11/24/13 11:40  AM
11/24/13 11:40 AM
20 cm of differential settlement under Quigley’s former neighbor.
11/24/13 11:41  AM
11/24/13 11:41 AM
11/24/13 11:42  AM
11/24/13 11:42 AM
The 70-year-old artesian well on Quigley’s former property still flows. The thick, extensive sands 4-20 m below Avonside, already prone to liquefaction but also expanded further by the high hydrostatic pressures, must be part of the reason liquefaction occurs so frequently in Avonside.
11/24/13 11:53  AM
11/24/13 11:53 AM
Settlement of the street and footpath.
11/24/13 11:56  AM
11/24/13 11:56 AM
Bastin discusses one of the fissures paralleling the banks of the Avon.
11/24/13 11:56  AM
11/24/13 11:56 AM
One of the fissures paralleling the banks of the Avon.
11/24/13 11:58  AM
11/24/13 11:58 AM
Some of the trees along the Avon show the effects of having their roots cut by fissuring, but most do not.
11/24/13 11:58  AM
11/24/13 11:58 AM
Some of the trees along the Avon show the effects of having their roots cut by fissuring, but most do not.
11/24/13 12:03  PM
11/24/13 12:03 PM
Pavement disruption and differential settlement in Avonside. Porta-potties and trash bins mark occupied properties.
11/24/13 12:14  PM
11/24/13 12:14 PM
Very young, fine arkosic sand from Avonside. It has its origin in the glaciers of the Southern Alps, carried long distances across the Canterbry Plains.
11/24/13 12:21  PM
11/24/13 12:21 PM
Trench at Sullivan Park in Avonside logged by Bastin and Quigley. This one shows a trash pit from an 1860s wool scouring operation across the street. Reports of liquefaction damage at the wool scour during an earthquake in the 1860s were not found until last year.
11/24/13 12:40  PM
11/24/13 12:40 PM
Trench at Sullivan Park in Avonside logged by Bastin and Quigley. Thick and thin layers of fine and medium sands, some well-graded, are all carbon-dated to less then 2000 b.p.
11/24/13 12:48  PM
11/24/13 12:48 PM
Trench at Sullivan Park in Avonside logged by Bastin and Quigley. Sand fill of a fissure.
11/24/13 12:50  PM
11/24/13 12:50 PM
Tracing a clastic dyke.
11/24/13 12:55  PM
11/24/13 12:55 PM
Trench at Sullivan Park in Avonside logged by Bastin and Quigley.
11/24/13 02:20  PM
11/24/13 02:20 PM
Bridge St. Reserve on the Avon Estuary, where the glasswort Sarcocornia high-tide indicator plant replaced Macrocarpa trees, indicating 45 cm subsidence in the 2011 event. Prof. Reid is explaining this from the stump of a dead Macrocarpa, recently removed.
11/24/13 02:21  PM
11/24/13 02:21 PM
Glasswort Sarcocornia high-tide indicator plant.
11/24/13 02:22  PM
11/24/13 02:22 PM
Dead and dying Macrocarpa pine trees.
11/24/13 02:22  PM
11/24/13 02:22 PM
Bridge St. Reserve, on the Avon Estuary, pushed below the spring high-tide line by the 2011 quake, killing the pine trees.
11/24/13 02:34  PM
11/24/13 02:34 PM
Marker set immediately after the 2011 quake marking the limit of the glasswort Sarcocornia high-tide indicator plant, now invaded 45 cm higher.
11/24/13 02:44  PM
11/24/13 02:44 PM
Sand blow in the estuary.